Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality Projects

I am exploring and leading various AR, VR, and MR related projects as a research fellow at the University of Melbourne. Many of these projects are in development or under review now, so I cannot put much details for now. More details to follow later:)

Augmented Studio

The Augmented Studio platform uses projection mapping to turn a human body into an interactive canvas in real-time. It uses projectors and depth sensors to enable projections of an anatomy model onto a moving body for practical physiotherapy classes, allowing students to observe the dynamic changes in the anatomical configuration of the body throughout a range of movements.

Body Canvas

This projects involves a public demonstration in collaboration with the Melbourne Science Gallery to investigate the use of On Body Projections in public settings. Body as a canvas creates an interaction loop where interaction with information causes changes in the body, which in turn changes the display of information. Our findings show that body as a canvas create connectedness between the body and information.



Publications

Human body in HCI is often seen as an actuator for issuing commands and providing input to digital systems. We present the concept of the body as a canvas, in which the body acts as both an actuator and a display for information. Body as a canvas creates an interaction loop where interaction with information causes changes in the body, which in turn changes the display of information. Our qualitative study using an on-body projection system in a public exhibition investigates this concept with regards to body characteristics, types of body input, interactions between multiple bodies, and comparison to other display technologies. Our findings show that body as a canvas create connectedness between the body and information. Finally, we discuss how body characteristics and appearances can complement the information, when the body acts as a canvas.
Virtual reality (VR) is now being designed and deployed in diverse sensitive settings, especially for therapeutic purposes. For example, VR experiences are used for diversional therapy in aged care and as therapy for people conditions such as phobias and post-traumatic stress. While these uses of VR offer great promise, they also present significant challenges. Given the novelty of VR, its immersive nature, and its impact on the user’s sense of reality, it can be particularly challenging to engage participants in co-design and predict what might go wrong when implementing these technologies in sensitive settings. This workshop provides a forum for researchers working in this emerging space to share stories about their experiences of designing and evaluating VR applications in settings such as aged care or mental health therapy. The workshop will develop a manifesto for good practice, outlining co-design strategies and ethical issues to consider when designing and deploying VR in sensitive settings.

Our Team

This has been a truely multi disciplinary team!

Image

Hasan Shahid Ferdous


Image

Frank Vetere


Image

Thuong Hoang



Image

Martin Reinoso


Image

Zaher Joukhadar


Image

David Kelly